Cinco de Mayo is not Mexican Independence Day

cinco_de_mayo

I'm a doctoral candidate in the Doctor of Public Health program at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. All opinions posted here are my own, of course, and they do not necessarily reflect the opinions of my school, employers, friends, family, etc. Feel free to follow me on Twitter: @EpiRen

8 thoughts on “Cinco de Mayo is not Mexican Independence Day

  1. Yes, but like St Patrick’s Day, it’s been coopted in the name of excessive beer consumption and fake ethnic hors-d’oeuvres.

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    • You’re so right about the fake ethnic hors-d’oeuvres. If I see one more invitation to Taco Bell, I’m going to scream.

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      • You will appreciate this anecdote; in 1979 I was stationed in Quantico, VA, at that time merely a wide spot in the road and 30 miles south of anything resembling international cooking. I remember asking a local if there were any Mexican restaurants in town and had her tell me there was a Taco Bell in Springfield.

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        • One of the first times we took out my father-in-law for lunch, he ordered a “quesadilla.” The waiter brought the quesadilla, and FIL said, “So this is a quesadilla?”
          It was funny because, according to my wife and her brother, FIL always ordered it at Taco Bell. There’s a wide difference between a Taco Bell quesadilla and that of an authentic Mexican restaurant, hand-crafted by an abuelita (granny).

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  2. This silliness is right up with the clueless person I observed at an ATM who was asked if they preferred English or Spanish. Her reaction was “Why would I speak Mexican?”. I just rolled my eyes. She was asked her choice between English and the most common language of the hemisphere of the planet she was in, Spanish. Screw all those from Brazil who speak Portuguese.

    😉

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  3. It just occurred to me that 5 May does commemorate the kicking out of the French, which went a bit better than the attempts to kick the Americans out of North Mexico. There was a recent Skeptoid where Jeff Wagg described some of those at the Alamo as “illegal aliens”:
    http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4457

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    • My wife and I went to San Antonio and took a tour of the Alamo. A little kid asked his mom what the battle there was all about. “Well, honey, the bad people… The Mexicans… They wanted to take over our land.” My wife and I just looked at each other in confusion. The battle happened when Texas was part of Mexico, and it was Santa Ana’s campaign to keep Texas with Mexico after all the Americans had illegally settled there and wanted to do what Putin did with Crimea. But, you know, the winner gets to tell the tale. It still hurts that the Mexicans were the “bad guys” in her silly little head.

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      • I wonder how well they will teach Manifest Destiny when that child takes high school American History class.

        I am still angry that my high school never mentioned the Japanese Internment. I learned about it from my dad because one of his best friends was imprisoned just because his parents had been born in Japan. And that friend never returned, because he joined the US Army and did not survive the war.

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