Recent Comments

Here are the last few comments on the blog. Please remember to read the comments and privacy policy for the blog before jumping into a discussion.

  • Comment on Is Gun Violence the Symptom or the Disease? by Rene Najera February 16, 2018 15:29
    Baby Ren is doing some regression thing. She’s up talking at night and occasionally needs attention. We think it’s the teething. But generally, yeah, 10-12 hour nights are the best, especially when I’m trying to write this dissertation thing.
  • Comment on Is Gun Violence the Symptom or the Disease? by Brett February 16, 2018 15:25
    lol! Love the edit. And thankfully, I no longer have to feed a baby at 3am as he sleeps 9-10 hours straight... (am now knocking on wood)..
  • Comment on Is Gun Violence the Symptom or the Disease? by Rene Najera February 15, 2018 20:21
    I'm at the Buffalo Wild Wings in Akron. Come down here. I will fight you. :-p Corrected it. See above.
  • Comment on Is Gun Violence the Symptom or the Disease? by Brett February 15, 2018 17:56
    Rene, seriously not trying to start anything, but you read the data wrong. Page 87 of the source document shows the 33k firearm deaths, then breaks it down by homicide and suicide. There are 11k firearm homicides and 21k suicides.
  • Comment on America First by Neglecting the World? by Rene Najera February 9, 2018 01:13
    Oh, don't get me started on what the many different USAMRUs (US Army Meridcal Research Units) are doing around the world. I know from colleagues that they have stopped some crazy stuff from getting here. But, yeah, I'm sure Ebola and friends know all about our immigration laws.
  • Comment on America First by Neglecting the World? by Chris February 8, 2018 04:58
    Ugh. As an Army brat spending almost half of my youth outside of the USA, I am amazed she does not realize Americans are actually assigned as federal employees to those countries. So Trump wants to have a military parade to show American strength, yet this yahoo is forgetting those Americans can be vulnerable to those diseases when they are at work... overseas. Should someone remember what the guy did that this is named after him: Walter Reed Army Institute of Research? Or why the hospital in Panama (where I was born) is named William Gorgas Hospital (don't be fooled by the name, the dude was not in anyway Panamanian, Cuban or Colombian). That Cuban researcher was Dr. Finley (never assume heritage by surname): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlos_Finlay Oh, and let us not forget those big things you see in the sky, occasionally putting streaks of water vapor in their wake: they are full of people, some that do carry disease. Apparently West Nile Virus was brought over by just one airplane landing in New York. This is a story recounted by the great storyteller Dickson Despommier on the very first podcast episode of TWiV (This Week in Virology).
  • Comment on The Imbalances of Violence by Rene Najera February 6, 2018 00:01
    So... We're stating facts? What are we doing here? What would you like me to tell you? I've written that it depends. If it's true that pitbulls are more aggressive than normal, but the person didn't know, then we cannot put all the blame on the person. If they knew, and did everything possible to avoid the bite, I'd put some blame but not a lot. If they knew and did nothing and then got bit, I'd place even more of the blame. What more would you like me to write? This is not a black-and-white, right-and-wrong situation. Few things are, and I'm not the kind of person who deals in absolutes. But, just for kicks, I'm going to disagree with your assertion that any dog doing any of those things has a bad temperament. After all, they were bred for that kind of thing. It's like saying, "Bad scorpion! Bad!" when the scorpion stings the frog.
  • Comment on The Imbalances of Violence by heatherclemenceau February 5, 2018 22:55
    Any dog that mauls a person, kills a child, or destroys pets and livestock has "bad temperament." The proportion of bites attributed to pit bulls is answered in the aforementioned studies. Without exception, epidemiologists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, trauma surgeons, etc have found that the frequency pit bull maulings exceed those of all other breeds. The majority of bites came from household pet dogs, who attacked members of their own families.
  • Comment on The Imbalances of Violence by Rene Najera February 5, 2018 03:58
    Oh, I believe that evidence, but it is not telling the whole story. It's like the study on planes returning from bombing raids during World War II. Most of the planes that returned were shot in the wings and the fuselage. So those parts were reinforced over reinforcing the engine. There was a big bias there: the planes being shot in the engine were not returning, and thus not being counted. So, yeah, I'm sure that the bites from pitbulls are severe and cause more death and disability over other dog types, but the questions are many. What proportion of all bites are attributed to pitbulls? What proportion of pitbull bites that are severe came from dogs with bad temperament, that were mistreated, where the owner didn't take reasonable steps to prevent this? And so on and so forth. In my opinion, no, the conclusion doesn't change... It's still "it depends."
  • Comment on The Imbalances of Violence by heatherclemenceau February 5, 2018 03:53
    Rene, I don't wish to make this a debate about the pit bull phenotype itself, but does the conclusion change if we look at what's available in PubMed? A review of the Pubmed database provides the following evidence-based studies that suggest that a majority of dog bite hospitalizations are attributed to pit bull phenotypes, often after analyses of decades worth of data. Effectiveness of breed-specific legislation in decreasing the incidence of dog-bite injury hospitalisations in people in the Canadian province of Manitoba Ocular Trauma From Dog Bites: Characterization, Associations, and Treatment Patterns at a Regional Level I Trauma Center Over 11 Years Morbidity of pediatric dog bites: A case series at a level one pediatric trauma center Breeds of dogs involved in fatal human attacks in the United States between 1979 and 1998 Fatal dog attacks, 1989-1994 Dog bite-related fatalities: a 15 year review of Kentucky Medical Examiner cases Fatal dog attacks in Canada, 1990 – 2007 Mortality, Mauling, and Maiming by Vicious Dogs Dog Bites in Urban Children Dog Bites of the Head and Neck Effectiveness of breed-specific legislation in decreasing the incidence of dog bite injury Periorbital trauma from pit bull terrier attacks Characteristics of 1616 Consecutive Dog Bite Injuries at a Single Institution Pit Bull attack causing limb threatening vascular trauma -A case series Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting Dog bites in a US county: age, body part, and breed in pediatric dog bites