Tag: #publicpolicy

What we should have been doing all along: Translational Epidemiology

When I was applying to get into the DrPH program, the interviewer -- who would later become my academic advisor -- asked me for my thoughts on Translational Epidemiology. Translational Epidemiology (TE) is the use of epidemiology in different stages between identifying a population-level problem to identifying a solution for it, to evaluating what that ...

Non-Biostatistician, Non-Epidemiologist Tries to Complain About Biostats and Epi

Don't you love it when people who don't know better think that they know better, and then they end up making fools of themselves? There is a particularly interesting anti-vaccine man by the name of Brian S. Hooker. He has a doctorate in biochemical engineering, according to his Wikipedia page. Maybe you remember BS Hooker ...

Navigating the Political Seas

Imagine for a minute that you are a resident of Puerto Rico. If you were born there, then you are a citizen of the United States. However, your vote for President doesn't count since Puerto Rico doesn't have any votes in the Electoral College. Congress makes laws that affect you but you don't have any ...

Public Health is in a bit of a pickle over the nasal flu vaccine

No more FluMist vaccine for flu this coming flu season. What are the implications? Many.

When politics trumps science and common sense

As I sit down to write this, I wonder how this blog and this blog post will affect any political future I may have. Then I remember that my aim is not to be a politician. Yes, I'll try to influence policy, but I will certainly not sell my soul to The Devil like so ...

Putting things in perspective when all things are not equal

One of the classes that I'm taking in the term that begins tomorrow is "Professional Epidemiological Methods." The class is supposed to give us a taste for the kind of things that epidemiologists in public health practice are supposed to do. As you may or may not know, I already spent 7 years as a ...

Homicides in Baltimore, an analysis of sorts

When I started working in Baltimore in 2007, plenty of people told me to be careful because of their perception of crime in Baltimore. That perception was fed by television dramas like "The Wire" or "Homicide: Life on the Street". In those television shows, we saw somewhat of a dystopian Baltimore where crime was rampant and ...

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Quarantine Shmarantine! Part 2: Let us not forget John Early of North Carolina

A few weeks ago, I told you the different reasons why I believe that quarantine doesn't work. My main argument boils down to the fact that human beings can think and plan and act when they feel that they are in danger. Being placed in an isolated area (e.g. a tent outside a hospital) and not allowed to see friends and family makes us feel in danger. Being told by the governor of a state in the United States that you are "obviously ill" makes you feel in danger. Seeing incompetence and panic over Ebola everywhere around you makes you feel in danger.

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Those who are divorced from reality

NOTE: Before you read any further, please consider bidding on an 8×10 print of a palace building in Korea. All proceeds go to Doctors Without Borders. Click here to check it out. Thank you. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there were 39,518 suicides in the United States in 2011 (the year ...

The Suicide Emergency

As part of my schoolwork this term, I've been doing a lot of research into suicide in the United States. It's a delicate subject in my family because of events in the recent past, but, like any other fear of mine, I've decided to grab it by the horns, look it in the eye, and ...